Group Members

Dr. Alexander Gottschalk
Professor & Group Leader     
phone +49-(0)69-798-42518fax +49-(0)69-798-763-42518
a.gottschalk@em.uni-frankfurt.de


Dr. Jana Liewald        
Postdoctoral Fellow
phone +49-(0)69-798-42513
j.liewald@biochem.uni-frankfurt.de

Dr. Christina Schüler      
Postdoctoral Fellow
phone +49-(0)69-798-42520
c.schueler@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Dr. Szi-Chieh Yu      
Postdoctoral Fellow
phone +49-(0)69-798-42520
yu@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Dr. Oleg Tolstenkov     
Postdoctoral Fellow
phone +49-(0)69-798-42713
Tolstenkov@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Dr. Wagner Steuer Costa     
Postdoctoral Fellow
phone +49-(0)69-798-42520
wasteuer@stud.uni-frankfurt.de

Negin AzimiHashemi        
PhD Student    
phone +49-(0)69-798-42511
azimihas@stud.uni-frankfurt.de

Alexandra Oranth   
PhD Student    
phone +49-(0)69-798-42519
aoranth@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Thilo Henß      
PhD Student
phone +49-(0)69-798-42519
s7141222@stud.uni-frankfurt.de

Jonas Weil    
PhD Student
phone +49-(0)69-798-42713
jonas.weil@stud.uni-frankfurt.de

Frank Becker    
PhD Student
phone +49-(0)69-798-42519
fr.becker@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Maximilian Bach    
PhD Student
phone +49-(0)69-798-42519
Bach@bpc.uni-frankfurt.de

Amelie Bergs  
Phd Student
phone +49-(0)69-798-42713
amelie.bergs@stud.uni-frankfurt.de

Martin Schneider  
IMO Master Student
phone +49-(0)69-798-42519
martinw.schneider@stud.uni-frankfurt.de

Isabell Franz  
IMO Master Student
phone +49-(0)69-798-42519

 

Molecular mechanisms of nicotine adaptation in Caenorhabditis elegans

We use C. elegans as a model system to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the adaptation of the neuro(muscular) system(s) to nicotine. Work in vertebrate systems showed that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine leads to long-lasting changes in both the abundance and the functional properties of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. The molecular mechanisms underlying these changes, which are believed to cause initially tolerance and ultimately addiction to the drug, remain poorly understood. Even though the simple C. elegans nervous system can not serve as a model for the psychological component of nicotine addiction, the molecules and genetic pathways that govern the initial molecular changes in nAChRs in response to nicotine are likely to be well conserved. We thus make use of the extensive repertoire of methods available in C. elegans to investigate these mechanisms, using a combination of behavioural studies, genetics, cell biology and electrophysiology.

This project is currently dormant